Archive for the ‘Baked Bread/ Bun/ Puff’ Category

I have not been baking for a while. It’s at the back of my mind for weeks on end. If there was a ~ quick and scrummy ~ cake I’d bake, then it has got to be that almost effortless and idiot-proof Banana Loaf Cake. Ha ha ha …

I’m glad my boys share the same sentiment as I do.

3 weeks ago (or probably longer..) I bought a nice-looking bunch of Chiquita bananas in the hope of ripening some of them for my Banana Loaf Cake. I needed only 3 bananas, so we ate the rest of the bananas. 


 

While the 3 bananas were dangling on the banana hook to be ripened, my poor guys tried to brush their temptation away. With the cold weather outside, it’s warm inside the house with the heating on. And the result? 3 completely blackened and over-riped bananas with some mouldy white spots after more than 2 weeks of ‘crucifixion’. OH * MY * GOD!!


  

“What are you going to do with those bananas? To ‘hatch’ more black bananas?“My hubby asked (with a hint of sarcasm)

LOL!

There go the bananas … in the bin“, he said, pointing to the dustbin.

I replied with a classic feedback cheekily, “I’ll make Banana Cake*grinning with guilt big time*

Erm… by the way, did I use the ultra black, over-riped and limpy and almost fermented bananas in my cake? 

Uh-uh! Don’t think so … I needed ripe bananas but they were way, way too ripe! So I bought a new batch of bananas and made sure they ripened within a visually correct duration of time. Ha ha …

Here were the bananas that went in my Banana Loaf Cake I baked last night.


Not Once But Many A Time … And The FIRST Time, Though!

The first tutorial I’ve watched on YouTube in making a Banana Bread was the demo by Stephanie Jaworski of JoyOfBaking.com and I have baked Banana Bread or Cake as well as muffins many times since. It’s the easiest cake to bake. And I have done several tweaks and modifications to suit my family’s palates and they usually turned out great, me thinks …

Last night, however, was the first time I baked the Cake with the help of the Thermomix.

Here’s how I did it, by combining recipes of a cake and a muffin.

Sorry for the bad photos as the only lighting I had was my kitchen tungsten halogen lamps. No natural (sun)light. I did say I baked the cake last night, didn’t I? *wink*

Banana Bread or Banana Cake? It looked like Bread but it tasted like Cake, so I called it Banana Loaf Cake! It was super yummy and moist. I kid you not…


Ingredient A

  •  240 g ripe bananas

Ingredients B

  • 125 g butter
  • 110 g cassonade light brown sugar
  • 1 tsp Vahiné natural vanilla powder

Ingredient C

  • ca 120 g eggs

Ingredient D

  • 60 g Lyle’s Golden Syrup

Ingredients E (dry ingredients)

  • 255 g APF
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon powder
  • A pinch of sea salt

Steps 

  • Pre-heat the oven to 160 degrees Celsius
  • Place A in TM bowl and blitz the bananas for 40 sec/ sp 5 until they form a creamy consistency. Set the mashed bananas aside in a separate bowl.

  • Add B and mix for 3 mins/ sp 5. Scrape down the sides of the inner bowl and continue mixing for another minute to form a light and creamy consistency. 
  • Add C one at a time. Beat for 10 sec/ sp 5 per egg. 
  • Add A and D to combine for 45 sec/ sp 5


  • Add E by weighing the dry ingredients, then tip the mixture into a clean bowl.  Fold in manually with a spatula until the mixture is combined.

  • Scoop the mixture into a greased loaf tin/ pan. Bake for 55 mins in a pre-heated oven. The cake is baked through if a skewer pricked in the middle of the cake comes out clean.



My Verdict?

I LURVE the smell of freshly-baked cakes and pastries, although I am not a sweet-tooth person. The smell that floated in my kitchen last night was heavenly. My boys were upstairs when I baked the Banana Loaf Cake and they could immediately smell baked bananas when they walked in the kitchen 🙂

While leaving the cake to cool on a wire rack, I just had to cut a generous slice of the cake (while still a bit warm). It was too tempting for me to let it sit until it’s cooled completely. And by the way, I’m a crust person, so the slice with the crusted end was mine! It may have appeared to look like it’s on the hard side but, surprisingly, tasting is believing and seeing is deceiving; it was actually quite soft and moist (crust et al).   I’m glad I added Lyle’s Golden Syrup. You could add Maple Syrup or Honey. The syrup gave the cake a nice tan colour and made it moistier and ‘stickier’ with a caramelised flavour. I left the Cake on the kitchen table overnight and had a slice for breakfast this morning. The softness and moistness of the cake remained.  Before I left for work, I placed the cake in the fridge. When I got home, I thought the cake would harden while being refrigerated, but no, it remained as soft and fresh. You know what?  This is by far, my favourite Banana Loaf Cake recipe sans nuts.  The next time, I will add some walnuts from my garden!
Have a great week!

Cheers!

I made my first foolproof steamed buns or paos 3 years ago. I’m glad I have gone through that pao-making journey the conventional way first before delving into the “mind” of an automated kitchen gadget early this year. This reminds me of learning to drive a manually-manoeuvred car first before going into an automatic-geared one.  

For the record, I am still a believer of manually operated cars. Call me old-fashioned, but isn’t that what we have to go through life first? Always learn and tackle the hard way first and everything else will be easy peasy? 😜

Three vs One

3 years ago, I went through the hurdles of getting the dough proofed 3 times before I could taste the fruit of my success. It was a long and winding process and the key word was ‘Patience’. My Kenwood did a fantastic job in kneading the dough to perfection…BUT it was the waiting time that consumed my day.

Here’s why …

First Proofing

Second Proofing


 

The pao on the right was proofed for the third time. The one on the left was proofed twice

With lots of patience, the paos turned out top notch in my books in terms of size and texture. 

L – R : Tau sar (red bean paste) bun and chicken bun

Then came the Thermomix.  My waiting time was reduced by two thirds as the buns required to be proofed only once for 30 mins.  That’s it!

And here’re the results…

Any difference?

    
 

Following my conventional pao recipe, I converted the method to that of the Thermomix way of cooking. Instead of vegetable shortening, I used corn oil.

Ingredients A

  • 120 g water
  • 20 g corn oil
  • 20 g sugar
  • 1 tsp instant dry yeast

Ingredients B –

  • 250 g Pao flour (note using plain flour is a healthier option but will not yield the white, soft and fluffy texture of a classic Chinese steamed buns)
  • A pinch of sea salt

Ingredient C –

  • 600 g water

How to prepare ?

  1. Place A in TM bowl: 30 sec/ 37 deg C/ sp 3
  2. Add B. Mix for 30 sec / sp 0 -> 6
  3. Knead for 2 mins
  4. Tip the dough on a work top and knead lightly to form a log shape. Cut 6 to 8 pieces from the dough.
  5. Flatten each ball into disc-shape and add char siew filling into each flattened disc.
  6. Proof the buns for 30 mins
  7. While waiting for the buns to rise, boil 600 g water @ 30 mins/ V/ spoon
  8. Place the proofed buns in the Varoma set (dish and tray). Steam for 25 mins/ V/ R/ sp 3. Rest for 5 mins before serving 

   
  

With homemade char siew filling

I would be lying if this was not yummy …

Verdict: The stark difference with using the TM was that, a huge proportion of my time has been saved as opposed to the conventional way. There appeared to be no difference in the texture of the pao immediately after it came out of the steamer (Varoma set), however, TM paos if left to cool too long would harden, unlike the traditional paos, which would remain soft and fluffy.  The only way to work around the TM paos was to freeze them as soon as they have cooled and steamed them when needed. Size-wise, TM paos were only slightly smaller (due to less proofing duration).  Both methods had no influence on the taste. They were equally yummy. Finally, use your imagination for the filling. It’s your pao, your call😜
I’m linking this post to Cook Blog Share Week 17 hosted by Sneaky Veg

Blessed Sunday!
Cheers

Baking – especially, bread – is not really my cup of tea, and yet I have baked this bread for the third time!

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When I baked this loaf for the first time, my sons urged me to bake it again the following day! Can you imagine that?

Well, I could totally understand 😉. Not only was the bread drop-dead gorgeous looking with the braids, it was immensely yummy with its wholesome filling.

And by the way, I have a secret to tell you, too.

I was amazed at how easy it was to put this bread together, especially coming from someone who does not have a penchant for bread-making. And believe you me, even the braiding was not rocket science. In fact it was simple weaving. I must say I was enjoying myself and feeling proud with every end result😉 

Secret of Success 

I owe my good execution (ahem!) to a great and humble “teacher”. I stumbled upon her recipes on YouTube. She has a very pleasing and honest voice and sweet disposition that easily magnetised a multitude of viewers and subscribers to her channels. There’s something about her that you can trust, ie, by following her recipes, you would end up being happy with the outcome. I have referred to two of her other recipes and have not felt disappointed.

She’s not a professional baker. Far from it. She’s like me – a mother with two sons, residing abroad, believes in God, loves her family and friends and cooking. To me, comparing like for like is the secret of success.

Well, shifu Aeri Lee, I nicked your recipe!

It was so good that I just had to spread the word. 

I followed Aeri’s dough method to a T while tweaking her ingredients by adding freshly torn basils and fresh thyme. I have also adjusted her main ingredients part of the recipe with flavours and degree of piquancy that agreed to our palates.

I added carrots for additional colour and texture. We all know carrots are available year-round, but there are unusual varieties harvested in late summer to autumn. Baby carrots, for instance.

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Main ingredients
(Inspired by Aeri’s Kitchen, tweaked according to personal taste) 

Yields 2 Loaves 

Baking time: 20 minutes at 200 deg Celsius 

  • 500 g mix of minced pork and kalf 
  • 2 Fresh tomatoes, chopped 
  • 1 Onion (diced) 
  • 1 tsp thai hot chilli flakes (not in recipe – optional)
  • 2 Garlic cloves (minced) 
  • 1 Red chilli (finely chopped) 
  • 1 Green chilli ( finely chopped)
  • Coarse Sea Salt (to taste) 
  • Freshly milled Sarawak white peppercorns (to taste) 
  • 1 Carrot (diced – not in recipe) 
  • 2 cm piece grated ginger (not in recipe) 
  • Olive Oil
    Fresh Basil (not in recipe) 
  • Some shredded or any grated cheese (not powder form) 

The Minced Filling – Method 

(Note: I made the filling the night before and refrigerated it) 

1. Sauteé the diced onion, minced garlic and grated ginger until fragrant. 

2. Add the minced meat. Stir and mix to combine until the meat turned colour (from pink to slightly cooked). 

3. Then add the chopped tomatoes, diced carrots, chilli flakes, finely chopped fresh chillies. Stir-fry for a few minutes and then add some freshly milled Sarawak white peppercorns, salt to taste and freshly-torn basil leaves. 

Dough Ingredients – 

  • 3 1/4 Cups All Purpose Flour 
  • 1/2 Cup Water (luke warm) 
  • 1/2 Cup Milk (luke warm) 
  • 1 Tbsp Butter (room temperature
  • 1 Tbsp Sugar 
  • 2 1/4 tsp Active Yeast (1 package)
  • 1 tsp Salt
    1 Egg Yoke (for egg wash) 
  • Fresh Thyme (not in recipe)
  • Fresh Basil (not in recipe) 


The Dough – Method 

1. In a large bowl, pour in the milk, water and yeast. Set aside for 5 minutes 

2. Then add in the Self-raising flour, salt, sugar, butter, basil and thyme. Knead the dough. 

3. Lightly grease the bowl and place the kneaded dough in a warm place for at least one hour (or in the oven with just the light on)

For the step-by-step method of handling and weaving the dough please refer here

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With the temperature outside plummeting to single digit of late, a slice of the freshly baked chilli bread is just mesmeric. Mmmm….

And what’s great about this bread is you can concoct the filling to a vegetarian version with ratatouille. The next time I bake this bread, I will make a curry chicken filling. Can’t wait😍

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I am linking this post to the following blog-hop cooking challenges – 

My Treasured Recipes #3 – Taste of Autumn (Oct/Nov 2014) hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House 

Lavender and Lovage’s “Sugar & Spice (November and December Cooking with Herbs Challenge)”

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Bangers & Mash’s November’s Spice Trail – Peppercorns

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This post is linked to Tasty Tuesdays hosted by Le Coin de Mel!

  

Have a fantastic weekend! 

Cheers!

If you happened to be reading this post and were wondering, “Where’s the bread? That does not look like bread”, then you are on the right post 😉

1. Pao de Queijo_closed up_basket

Pão de Queijo is cheese bread in Portuguese!

At first I thought pão is bun, as is used in Hokkien (pao = bun), however, ‘boa’ is bun in Portuguese.

When I first discovered that pão de queijo is cheese-flavoured bread, the word queijo kept replaying in my head like an old, broken gramophone.

Okey doke, the penny dropped! I realised where I have heard the word queijo from. It’s a word that I came across when I was in school in Malaysia. In the Malay language, ‘keju’ is cheese.

Oh by the way, the Malay language has many loanwords, one of which is Portuguese, and one of which is queijo = keju = cheese.

A Truly Brazilian July

Honestly speaking, July 2014 had been a very sportive month, with many back-to-back international competitions, such as the Le Tour de France, Gand Slam (tennis) in Wimbledon on grass, XX Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, and last but not least – and probably – the most prominent of all Tournaments was the 20th FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil.

Although the host country did not win the World Cup this year, Brazil has won the hearts of millions of people with her much acclaimed cheesy bread.

Pão de Queijo had been flying around the net like nobody’s business this summer.

Ooh! Wow! Yum!

Yup, I exclaimed those words in that sequence – really, and, not wanting to be left gawking at the photos for nothing, I joined in the crowd.

The following proverb tells a lot about me. “Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day; show him how to catch fish, and you feed him for a lifetime.”Unknown

2. Pao de Queijo_closed up_basket3
Mine! Mine! Mine! (remember the seagulls in Finding Nemo?) LOL!

Addictively Cheesy!

Yes, Addictively Cheesy!

Pop one in your mouth and you will be popping in chain reaction. Ha ha ha..

Pão de Queijo is crunchy dough snack with a mild cheese flavour. These little gems are eaten throughout Brazil, at breakfast or as a snack. I think the secret behind this addictive delicacy is the crispy outer layer while the inside is almost hollow and chewy and moist.

3. Pao de Queijo_cheezy

Yum!

The essential ingredients used in making Pão de Queijo are very similar to making Popovers – eggs, milk, flour, oil or melted butter and salt. The only glaring differences are the use of cassava flour (or tapioca starch) and cheese(s), hence, living up to its name.

I noticed there are 2 ways of preparing these cheesy bread (1) the all-in –one method with the cold milk-oil-flour-salt-egg-cheese mixture pouring in the cavity of each muffin tin or pan or (2) the boiled milk-oil-salt mixture amalgamating in the flour followed by beaten eggs and cheese.

I have tried the first method first. Personally, I prefer the second method because it’s the authentic and traditional way of preparing Pão de Queijo.

Here’s one I made earlier using the first method, very similar to making popovers or Yorkshire puddings. Oops…not the best photography 😦

4. Pao de Queijo_cold process_r

In this post, however, I have based my recipe on a cool looking Cookbook, in the Dutch version, “BRASIL! Het Kookboek” (BRAZIL! The Cookbook) by David Ponte, Lizzy Barber and Jamie Barber. Note I have made some variations with my comments in blue italic.

5. Pao de Queijo_Cookbook_r

Ingredients –

  • 1.25 dl full cream milk
  • 50 ml Sunflower oil (I used Corn oil)
  • 1 tsp sea salt (or to taste)
  • 250 gm cassava flour (or tapioca starch/ flour)
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten (I used 2 small eggs)
  • 200 gm Parmesan or cheddar, grated (I used 100g grated Parmigiano Reggiano plus 150g Mozarella)

Method –

  • Pour 1.25 dl milk, Sunflower oil and salt in a large saucepan and bring the mixture to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat once the mixture starts to rise and bubble. Add the flour and quickly stir the mixture vigorously until there is no trace of dry tapioca flour. Stir to form moist dough. Transfer the dough to the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Let the dough cool slightly.
  • Add the eggs to the cooled dough and mix them through at low speed. Increase the speed after 1-2 minutes and blend the mixture on high speed until all the egg is incorporated and the dough is smooth. Add the grated Parmesan (Parmigiano reggiano and Mozarella) and continue mixing until the cheese is incorporated in the dough mixture. 6. Pao de Queijo_kneaded dough
  • Line a baking sheet or parchment paper. Moisten the palms of your hands with water or oil. Take a tablespoon of dough and roll into balls. Wash your hands in between before shaping the balls, because the dough is very sticky. (You can also use a small ice cream scoop. Dip the scoop into ice water and shake off excess water before shaping the balls). Place the balls 2.5 cm apart on the baking sheet.
  • Preheat the oven to 200 degrees Celsius. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown. They should be crispy on the outside and a little gooey inside. Serve immediately.

7. Pao de Queijo_in the oven_r

Depending on your oven and the size of the cheese balls, the result can go either way – too golden or too pale. Below the outcome of the baking times at 25 mins (top half) and 22 mins (below half).

8. Pao de Queijo_25 vs 22

I must admit that the ones baked for 25 minutes were crunchier with small pockets of air within the dough. They were less gooey than the ones baked for 22 minutes. The verdict? I loved both, because they’re Mine! Mine! Mine!   Ha ha ha…

9. Pao de Queijo_25 mins10. Pao de Queijo_22mins

11. Pao de Queijo_closed up_basket212. Pao de Queijo_jar2

I am sharing this recipe to the following blog-hop events –

Cook-Your-Books#16 hosted by Joyce from Kitchen Flavours

Cook Your Books

Bake Along with the theme “Popovers”, hosted by Zoe from Bake for Happy Kids, Lena from Her Frozen Wings and Joyce from Kitchen Flavours

Bake Along

Weekend Cooking hosted by Beth Fish Reads

Weekend Cooking

 

 

Cheers!

There must be something about Ireland or Irish that fascinates me quite a bit. In my previous post, here, I wrote briefly about watching one of the most spectacular shows I have ever watched live in years. It was none other than Riverdance – The International Irish Dancing Phenomenon, that made a breakthrough during an interval appearance at The 1994 Eurovision Song Contest in Dublin. Without a doubt, the success of Riverdance was by far the most commercially successful Eurovision ever.

And by the way, Ireland has the highest number of wins at the Eurovision Song Contest. A magnificent 7!

When Riverdance became 20 years old this year, they made their Anniversary Tour round the globe, which included performing at Brussels Expo. I was really glad that we could get 4 tickets for the show, albeit sitting on a high and distant balcony from the stage *grin*

In hindsight, I wished I had brought a pair of binoculars that evening. These blurry pictures remained forever in my archived picture folder.

1. Riverdance2 2. Riverdance1

I was completely blown away by the mesmeric sound of the unison rapid tapping of leg and foot movements. At some point of time, I felt like rushing down the balcony and climbing up the stage and joined the dance troupe. I bet I would be squashed like a fly in split second. LOL!

When Irish Eyes Are Smiling

Funny how this tune kept playing and re-playing in my head. I used to hear my late Dad singing this lighthearted song in his bass voice while plucking and strumming the guitar. My Mum would sing along in her angelic voice. Beautiful!

By the way, there’s not a hint of Irish blood in my family. Far from it!

Although the alma mater of my Dad, my grandfather and my great-grandfather was founded by the Mill Hill Missionaries of London, it was later that my brothers and I went to the same alma mater (St Joseph’s) that came under the principalship of the Lasallian Brothers from Ireland.

St Joseph’s School in Kuching is an all-boys school, with admission of girls only in the 6th Form. It is one of the most sought-after premier schools of Sarawak, acing in both academic and co-curricular activities. I believe it is the only school in Kuching that still carries the school motto in Latin “Ora et Labora” (Pray and Work).

Pray and work we did under the capable wings of the smiling eyes of the Irish La Salle Brothers. It has been a privilege to be a Josephian, and of course prior to that, a Teresian. You can read the full write-up of my alma mater of 11 years and 3 days, HERE

Feeling More(ir)ish

Feeling somewhat “Irish”, I decided to make this hybrid of bread, flatbread and scone- type bun, called “Boxty”. The word boxty is derived from the Gaelic word aran bocht ti, which means “poor house bread” by making use of the most famous Irish staple – the potato!

The main ingredients in a Boxty included boiled mashed potatoes, raw grated potatoes, flour, baking powder/soda, (butter)milk and salt. There are 3 different ways of preparing boxty, ie pan boxty (pancake/ flatbread-type), baked boxty (loaf or bun) and boiled boxty (dumplings). Recently, I made boxty in the oven, hence, baked boxty (bun-type).

A boxty dish is rather plain and bland; hence, I spiked mine with fresh herbs and aromatic salt. Lovely!

3. Boxty in the oven_closed up2r 

It’s a really easy recipe to follow. I could swear the chance of failure is almost ZERO. No proofing necessary. No stand or hand mixer necessary. Just mix all the ingredients and knead the dough briefly. That’s IT! It’s easy peasy and delightfully wholesome, tasty and moreish.

The recipe is adapted from the Dutch-translated cookbook called “100 recepten Brood” or in English, Bread – compilation of 100 recipes from Parragon Publishing (LoveFood), with my modification in blue. The name of the recipe is “Iers aardappelbrood” (Irish Potato Bread).

3x. Irish Farls_recipe book 

Ingredients-

(Makes 4 medium-sized buns)

  • 7 floury potatoes (about 800g) – I used the Boni Selection Kook-aardappelen “bloemig”(meaning floury, NOT waxy. I used 8 potatoes.
  • 2 Tbsp salted butter (I used Solo, Bakken en Braden slightly salted butter, about 50g)
  • 150 ml milk
  • 2 tsp salt (I used 1 tsp of coarse sea salt, pounded finely with pestle and mortar and 1 tsp of Sel fin de Camargue aux Herbes)
  • ½ tsp pepper ( I used black pepper, about 20 turns of the pepper mill)
  • 1 ½ tsp dill or caraway seeds (I used one bunch of fresh chopped dill)
  • 400 g plain flour, plus extra for rolling out and dusting
  • 5 tsp baking powder (about 20g)

Preparation –

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 190 deg C. Peel 4 of the potatoes and cut into similar sizes. Instead of boiling the potatoes, I steamed the potatoes in the microwavable steaming basket for 9 minutes on 600W. Add the butter and mash the potatoes to a smooth puree.
  2. Peel the remaining potatoes and grate coarsely. Put the grated potatoes into a clean piece of muslin and squeeze out as much liquid or moisture as possible. Transfer the grated potatoes into a large bowl, adding the milk, fresh chopped dill, salt, freshly milled black pepper and the mashed potatoes. Mix to combine all the ingredients.
  3. Sift the flour and baking powder over the potato mixture. Mix to a smooth dough. If necessary, add a little more flour. For me, 400 g was perfect.
  4. Now, knead the dough lightly into a flattish round and divide the dough into “farls”, another Gaelic word meaning four quarters. Shape each quarter into a ball, and flatten to a thick-ish round and score or mark the top of the bun with a knife into 4 quarters, or a cross.
  5. Place the buns on a baking tray lined with baking or parchment paper. Bake for 40 minutes, or until well risen and golden brown. Let cool on a wire rack.

 4. Boxty in the oven_mashed + grated potatoes_r

5. Boxty in the oven_mixed ingredients_r

6. Boxty in the oven_divide into 4_farls_r

7. Boxty in the oven_baked + cooling rack_r

I must warn you that these baked boxties were quite dense and literally speaking, heavier (weight-wise) than a normal bun or bread. Boxty is quite versatile and can be served any way you want. I had my baked boxty served with a plate of homemade Salad Niçoise. YUMMY!

8. Boxty in the oven_bun served with salad_r

9. Boxty in the oven_bun served with salad2_r

Boxty is listed as one of the notable Irish cuisines that it has inspired folk rhymes. The one below is dedicated to all the single ladies out there *wink*

Boxty on the griddle,
Boxty in the pan,
If you can’t bake boxty
Sure you’ll never get a man.

LOL!

In my humble opinion, this great and simple dish is not only for single ladies, but also for young bachelors and an excellent dish for students and families on a frugal budget.

10. Boxty in the oven_closed up_r

11. Boxty in the oven_stack of baked buns_r

12. Boxty in the oven_cross-section of bun_r

Because potato is the main ingredient in this dish, I will definitely link this post to Little Thumbs Up (July 2014 Event: POTATO), organised by Zoe of Bake for Happy Kids and Doreen or Mui Mui as she’s fondly called of My Little Favourite DIY. The July LTU is hosted by Jasline of Foodie Baker.

Little Thumbs Up

Boxty in the oven or the Irish Potato Bread is adapted from a little cookbook about bread making from all over the world. I would like to share a little bit of Irish with Joyce from Kitchen Flavours and everyone else who feels like having a boxty for breakfast, lunch, dinner or supper or just about any time of the day at Cook-Your-Books #14

Cook Your Books

These baked boxties are great with just about anything. I had mine with a plate of homemade Salad Niçoise. Perfect! You may want your boxty alongside a bowl of soup, as a snack or to pack in a picnic. The sky’s the limit! For this, I’m linking this post to Four Seasons Food hosted by Delicieux and Eat Your Veg. The July theme is Four Seasons Food goes Al Fresco, so hop along and check out the post  HERE 

FSF

I’ve not been linking to Beth Fish Reads’Weekend Cooking for quite a while. The last time I wanted to link a post to Beth’s blog, Mister Linky’s Magical Widgets was closed. Anyway, I have not been posting like a bullet train, but more so, a locomotive. Slowly but surely J. Do check out Beth Fish Read’s blog here

Weekend Cooking

Since I have used fresh herbs in this boxty recipe, I’m also linking this post to Lavender and Lovage’s Cooking with Herbs July Challenge

Cooking with Herbs

 

After getting a stamp of approval from my three guys for steaming my very first foolproof baos / buns – with success – there was no stopping me.  I steamed some more buns last weekend!

Did I not impart in my endnote, here, that I was a happy BUN-ny? 😀

I made the chicken-filled buns – again – last weekend on the request of my sons.  I thought the equation of steaming more buns meant requiring the consumption of a gigantic portion of chicken meat, hence, I bought a whole rotisserie chicken (kip aan’t spit).  Duh!

Chix pao_Kip aan 't spitWhen I saw how much meat I could fork out from the bird, well, maybe a bit too much for my chicken-filled paos, I had to put Plan B in action. Waste not, want not 😀

2. Curry puffs_ meat removed

I knew immediately what I wanted to make from the balance of the chicken mixture. Yep, curry puffs!!  This is one snack that brings me down memory lane.  I LURVE curry puffs 😀

2z. Curry puffs_curry puffs

Short cut to success

Curry Puff = Curry + Puff

Didn’t I say it’s easy peasy (breezy)?

Okay, I’m cheating here, because I bought two store bought puff pastries, one called ‘bladerdeeg met boter’ (puff pastry with butter) and the other, simply, ‘bladerdeeg’ (puff pastry).  By the way, isn’t butter one of the key ingredients in making puff pastries?  Erm…double dose of Duh’s… LOL!

I bought two different types of puff pastries because I was not sure which of the two puff pastries would engage well with my curry puff recipe.  If one fails, I would not be left in the lurch.

Now, the curry – I used Yeo’s Malaysian Curry Powder. Oh by the way, this was a gift from Chris – all the way from Ohio, USA!   Thank you, my friend.  The crinkled look on the packet means that the curry has not been deserted.  It was used to the fullest 😀

3. Curry puffs_curry powder

Ingredients:-

2 packets store bought puff pastries (makes 20 curry puffs)

Curry powder, to taste – honestly speaking, I used quite a lot, as I love curries 😛

I will omit the measurements in this post because it doesn’t make sense as the curry chicken filling was the leftover of the chicken-mix for my steamed buns. Please hop over here where the more precise ingredients and method can be found prior to adding the curry powderI added dried shiitake mushrooms this time.

Rotisserie chicken (pre-grilled/ pre-roasted/ pre-baked chicken meat or any of your favourite cooked meat!) – Believe you me; pre-cooked meat is a savior to this dish as it cuts a chunk of your cooking time. This statement concurs the ‘hassle-free’ part 😉

Carrot, grated

Spring Onion – cut in small rings

Ginger (I used one whole young ginger, grated)

Garlic, minced with some coarse sea salt

Roots of fresh coriander, minced

Dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked in boiling water for 30 minutes until plumped up

Sesame Oil

Soy sauce (I used Kikkoman soy sauce)

Shaohsing wine (optional – this was used for the steamed buns. Please omit, if you must)

Oyster sauce

White pepper (I added freshly milled black peper)

Sugar – taste for balance

Water and cornflour to thicken the sauce

Vegetable Oil

1egg, beaten – brushed on coating  

4a. Curry puffs_ingredients14b. Curry puffs_ingredients2

Pre-heat the oven to 190 degrees Celsius.

Once the chicken mixture is combined, add the curry powder. Stir well; making sure that the chicken mixture is coated completely with the curry powder. Refrigerate until you are ready to handle the puff pastries.

5a. Curry puffs_ingredients35b. Curry puffs_ingredients4

Scoop 1 tea-spoonful of the curry chicken filling onto each dough circle. I used a drinking glass of 8 cm in diameter to mould the circles from the puff pastry.

6. Curry puffs_chix filling

Fold the chicken-filled pastry in half moon and start crimping or pleating the crust. I used the fork crust crimp method. Easy peasy! No hassle.

Finally, bake the curry puffs for 20 minutes or until golden brown.  My kitchen smelled exquisite that Sunday afternoon 😉

By the way, the rope crust crimp method would be really stylish and elegant looking. I tried doing that but most did not turn out with that rope crust crimped effect at all.  I did, however, manage to crimp one which turned out to be one big ugly blob!  I just gave up *sigh*

This was one monster curry puff! My sons said this looked like a dead chicken. LOL!

7. Curry puffs_monster puff

‘Dead chicken’ aside, I did pull some good lookers 😉

Et voilà!

My easy peasy hassle-free curry puffs for any busy full-time working or stay-at-home Mums. Yummilicious!

Curry puffs made with puff pastry with butter

Curry puffs made with puff pastry with butter

The fork crust crimped curry puffs were made with the 'normal' puff pastry

The fork crust crimped curry puffs were made with the ‘normal’ puff pastry

Closed up of the freshly baked curry puffs :-D

Closed up of the freshly baked curry puffs 😀

My Monday morning breakfast.  YUMMY!

My Monday morning breakfast. YUMMY!

By the way, do you remember these?

9a, Curry puffs_cross-section19b. Curry puffs_cross-section2

That’s the cross-section of the once-upon-a-time ugly blob!  As a saying goes, “Don’t judge a book by it’s cover”…

I rest my case  😉 

I am submitting this entry to the Little Thumbs Up event with the theme ,”CURRY”, hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders, organized by Zoe of Bake for Happy Kids and Doreen of my little favourite D.I.Y

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As well as to the September 2013 Cooking With Herbs Blog Challenge hosted by Lavender and Lovage

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Cheers and carry on curry-ing!