Archive for the ‘Snack’ Category

Oh Wow! I am blown away by the dance movements of an uber talented young dancer. Every time I watch her on YouTube, I am completely mesmerised. 

No wonder the channel is closed to 800 million hits!  Wow! That’s one monstrous and absolutely deserving statistic.

1,2,3 1,2,3 drink … 1,2,3 1,2,3 drink … Sia’s Chandelier and Maddie Ziegler’s dance movements kept ringing in my head and my mind’s eye like an old gramophone. 

I wish I could sing like Sia and dance like Maddie. But it’s not meant to be…. Okay let’s leave the professional acts to the professionals and leave the amateur – c’est moi – green with envy. LOL!

And by the way, I felt “literally” green. I was thinking green and yearning for something green! 

And here’s the result!  

My green-eyed green fritters:-D

It’s deliriously easy to make. Think green. Go green. Chop-chop, dice-dice and mix to amalgamate the herbs, the dry and the wet ingredients. 

You need –

  • Flour, eyeballed
  • 1 heap teaspoon baking powder
  • Chives, chopped finely
  • Spring onions, chopped finely
  • Green Paprika, finely diced
  • Fresh coriander, roughly torn
  • 1 onion, finely diced 
  • 1 green chilli, finely diced
  • Coarse sea salt and black peppercorns, ground with pestle and mortar
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten 
  • Some water, eyeballed
  • Vegetable stock cube (optional)
  • A pinch of sugar (optional)
  • Cooking Oil ( I used corn oil)

 

Mix the flour, baking powder and egg into the bowl of chopped greens and onion. Add some water to form a batter which is neither too thick nor too runny.  Season with the ground mix of coarse sea salt and black peppercorns. You may want to crumble a quarter of a vegetable stock cube and a pinch of sugar for balance of flavour. 

Scoop a tablespoon of the batter and drop it in a heated wok or frying pan with cooking oil. Flatten with the back of the spoon to make a flat pattie. I shallow fried the fritters until crisp and golden brown on both sides.

Remove with a slotted spoon and rest the fritters in a colander lined with absorbent papers.

And there you have it, one of my favourite savoury snacks to make. Easy peasy! 

1,2,3 1,2,3…eat 🙂 

  

  

 

Verdict: These fritters go well with a squirt of tomato ketchup or chilli sauce or the fiery sriracha sauce or home-made cucumber chilli sauce with a sprinkle of sesame seeds or crushed peanuts.  Mmmm… Refreshingly yummy! 

As with all kinds of fritters, the crisp texture on the outside will be soft when cold, however, if you want that crispy outer layer, then you need to bake them in the oven. Microwaving the fritters will not produce the same result. To be honest, I’m not a finicky eater. Refrigerated cold green fritters are good enough for me if they are not stale or rancid 😉

Enjoy!

I’m linking this post over at Eat Your Greens, hosted by A2K – A Seasonal Veg Table

 

Happy Mid-Week!

Cheers!

 





Either you like it or you LOVE it! I don’t think I’ve met anyone who does not like Chicken Satay, unless you’re a vegetarian or a vegan 😉

 

This meat on skewer snack makes one of the best, tastiest and fast moving pot-luck platters loved by every carnivore from 2 to 92!  Chicken or Beef Satays are popular dishes at Malay ‘kenduri‘ (feast), and open-houses during the festive seasons. This dish knows no boundaries and appears on the table of a Chinese family at Chinese New Year, a Malay/ Muslim at Hari Raya Aidil Fitri or Eid al-Fitr, a Christian at Christmas, an Indian/ Hindu at Deepavali, native Sarawakian at Hari Gawai and native Sabahan at Pesta Kaamatan (Harvest Festival). It’s a dish that unites the people of Malaysia! Satays are sold in every strata of the society from roadside hawker stall to high end hotel restaurants.

 

My husband and both my sons LOVE their skewered meat. It’s sweet, tasty and simply delicious on its own but doubly addictive, smothered with peanut sauce!  It has been a while since I made this dish and I thought of treating the guys to another feast of chicken satay *wink*

  

 

Labour of Love

 

It takes only seconds to nibble the skewered meat down one’s throat, but it takes a LOT of preparation and a LONG time waiting for the end result. I call it “labour of love”. That accounts to the infrequent investment of time in making the dish at home, especially so when I’m the one and only chef in the kitchen 😦

 

The labour begins with the chopping of the fresh herbs and spices and blend them, one for the meat marinade and another batch for the peanut sauce.  The sliced meat needs to be marinated overnight, hence, a waiting time of 12 hours or more.  The peanut sauce takes at least 2-3 hours to cook to the right taste and consistency.  It’s hard work if done alone and I’m glad I had 3 pairs of thumbs UP, otherwise, I’d go on strike. LOL!

  

 

To Bake or to Grill?

 

Authentic satays are sold, grilled over hot charcoals, dabbed with cooking oil and coconut milk using a stalk of lemongrass, bruised at the fatter end of the stalk, like a paint brush. The taste and aroma of the slightly charred meat is to die for.  

 

My first chicken satay made in Belgium were oven-baked, and the most recent ones were home-grilled using an electric Grill-teppanyaki hot plate, which I got as a gift from work. It’s so easy, but you need to make sure that the kitchen extractor is on at full blast and the windows are opened!  It can be a rather smoky affair 🙂


But the result was worth it!

  

 

Main Item (for the satay) –

  • 1 kg chicken meat (I used 5 pieces chicken breasts)

Marinade ingredients-

For blending

  • 9 shallots
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 2 lemongrass
  • 4 candle nuts 
  • Fresh ginger
  • Fresh turmeric

Dry ingredients to be added to blended ingredients-

  • 1/2 Tbsp cumin powder
  • 1/2 Tbsp coriander powder
  • 1/4 Tbsp cinnamon powder
  • Brown sugar and salt, to taste

Marinade chicken overnight.

  1.     

Peanut Sauce

Ingredients

  • 400g roasted peanuts
  • Fresh ginger
  • Fresh turmeric
  • Galangal
  • 4 Lemongrass 
  • 20g dried shrimps in lieu of belacan
  • 4 candle nuts 
  • 12 dried chillies
  • 3 fresh chillies
  • 9 shallots
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds, ground 
  • Tamarind paste
  • Cumin powder
  • Coriander powder
  • Brown sugar, to taste
  • Salt, to taste
  • Water
  • Cooking oil 

   

   

I prefer to have lots of peanuts in my peanut sauce, hence, you will notice that the end result of my peanut sauce is a lot thicker than the ones you get at  the satay stalls or restaurants in Malaysia. Well, nothing beats home-cooked food wherever you may be 😉 

If you have an allergy for peanuts, try cashew nuts or any other nuts of your choice. I’m sure they work as well. 

!! Warning !! Please be warned when using candlenuts.  According to Wikipedia, the seeds contain saponin and phorbol, that are mildly toxic when raw.

The rule of thumb as follows-

  1. If making uncooked sambal, it is absolutely a must to toast / dry roast the candlenuts before blending them with the rest of the herbs and spices
  2. If you are making a paste which includes candlenuts as one of the ingredients, make sure to stir-fry the paste absolutely well before preparing your desired dish.

And by the way, the chicken satay freezes well too. 

I’m linking this post to Little Thumbs Up April event “CHICKEN“, organised by Zoe of Bake for Happy Kids and Doreen of my little favourite DIY, and hosted by Diana from Domestic Goddess Wannabe 

 


This post is also linked to HonestMum @ Tasty Tuesdays live.

 


I’m also linking this tasty chicken satay dish with its absolutely delicious peanut sauce to Lavender and Lovage’s Cooking with Herbs April Linky

 


Cheers!

My two sons were very excited at the prospect of their aunt’s and grandma’s visit last summer. They were secretly wishing, or rather, hoping, that their aunt (my sister) would be bringing along in their trip the most incredibly dreamy snack in the world – for them, at least – ie.,the savoury-sweet dried meat slices aka bak kwa.

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Bak kwa is quite similar to jerky but is not an equivalent definition. While the making of jerky uses lean meat (where most of the fat must be trimmed off) and then are cut into thin strips and dried with some salt to prevent spoilage, bak kwa is made with meat preservation, ie sweet and savoury marinades and requires at least 10% of fat, and then are dried by cooking at low temperature before cutting into squares and barbecuing over glowing fire.

By the way, my personal preference is the sliced bak kwa, however, minced meat bak kwa can be made anytime in the comfort of one’s kitchen. I was amazed at how easy it was to make this most sought-after Chinese New Year snack. The most renowned bak kwa is the Singaporean brand, Bee Cheng Hiang..

The barbecue aroma of the Bee Cheng Hiang bak kwa will linger in the palate from the first bite. Oh darn! It’s so addictive!

My sister hand-carried not one, but five packets of the savoury sweet meats – sliced pork, minced pork, chicken, turkey floss and crispy pork floss. My boys and I were over the moon. But… but … Wow! The price tags! I goggled at the price labels in disbelief. They cost a fortune! Thanks, sis, for the most incredibly scrumptious gifts.

6 months down the road, I wanted to relive that moment. What better time to buck up with Chinese New Year round the corner.

I went in search for Bee Cheng Hiang bak kwa recipe on the Internet. Zilch! Then again, most bloggers seemed to be using almost identical array of ingredients. THE most important point to consider in making bak kwa is how much of each ingredient is used to create a well-balanced flavour and texture. That was not easy the first or second time round. I’m speaking by experience here.

I have made the snack twice recently. The first time was completely impromptu as I had 300g of very lean calf mince in the fridge, which was meant for making bolognese sauce. Lean or not, I just had to make those bak kwa. I referred to the recipe from an online newsletter Mothership.sg. A contributor posted Homemade bak kwa from scratch . It’s not the nicest looking bak kwa but it’s more the technique of execution I was looking for. The idea of leaving the oven door ajar just to dry the meat and not burn or over-cook it was a clever idea, I thought. I bookmarked the recipe and this was the result!

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I followed the recipe to a tee by mathematically apportioning the measurement based on the 300g of minced meat.

I had quite positive comments from the guys. “Quite” because it was not perfect yet. Well, 300g was definitely not a lot of meat, hence, they were immediately gone from the moment the meat came out of the oven. There were two drawbacks, firstly the meat was TOO lean, and secondly, it was a wee bit salty to our liking. Everything else was almost perfect.

Once Bitten Twice Shy

I vowed to make a bigger batch with more fatty minced. I chose a mixture of pork and calf/ beef.

The original recipe used 1 kg, however I bought a bit more and increased the sweeter marinades (honey and kecap manis) by a tablespoon each.

Ingredients inspired from Mothership.sg with some modifications :
1.374 kg mix minced pork-beef
100g cassonade brown sugar
2 Tbsp fish sauce
2 Tbsp light soy sauce
2 Tbsp mushroom oyster sauce (vegetarian)
2 Tbsp Shaoxing wine
2 Tbsp ABC kecap manis (sweet soy sauce)
1/2 tsp 5- spice powder
1/2 tsp dark soy sauce
2 Tbsp Borneo Wild runny honey ( which I got from one of my sisters)
White Pepper
(Note I did not add salt while increasing the measurements of the sweeter marinades)

Additional ingredients: water and honey for brushing . I lost count on the measurements because I used quite a lot in several rounds, brushing every single slice, both sides, on the hot grill.

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Method –

1. Add all the ingredients and mix in well with the minced meat. I used a pair of chopsticks to stir until the mixture reaches a gooey consistency.

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2. Refrigerate the meat mixture overnight, covered with a clingfilm. When out of the fridge the next day, you will notice the colour of the mixture becomes more deep and intense. That means the meat mixture is cured. The Belgians would call this filet américain or a Martino . LOL!

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3. Spread the cured meat on a rectangular baking tray lined with a baking sheet. Cover the meat with a cling wrap and flatten it with a rolling pin, or you may use the back of a spoon.

4. Once the meat is flattened equally and thinly, transfer the baking tray to a pre-heated oven at 150 degrees Celcius. Leave the oven door ajar. All you need is to dry out the meat and not cook it thoroughly. The last thing you want is a burnt bak kwa. It takes about 15 minutes, depending on the type of your oven. At this stage, the juices from the meat will ooze. Remove the juice. I then cut the meat into desired squares and leave the meat to cool on a cooling rack.

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5. At this stage, I used my own method to wrap up the grand finale. I let my oven to R.I.P for the rest of the day while I unwrapped my secret weapon.

This!

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By the way, this was a gift I chose as my Year End gift from work. We were each given a unique password to order our Year End gift online. There were a few items to choose from : For Her, For Him, For Family or For Charity. I had my 2 sons to help me choose the gift and we finally agreed on the Tristar grill-teppanyaki-hot plate. 😀

Glad that the gift came in handy ! 😉

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

As quoted from the homepage of Bee Cheng HiangThe bakkwa is then barbecued over a glowing fire until it spatters and caramelize the tender meat in the all right place. Hot grill combined with dripping meat juice releases a sweet barbecue aroma to the already succulent meat meld together to deliver the authentic Bee Cheng Hiang Bakkwa”

Unquote

And enjoy ogling;-)

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Visually, the bak kwa looks really authentic if kept the next day(s) in the fridge.

Like so …

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The meat became tastier and that’s when you would want to make a conclusion, ” it’s just perfect ” or “it’s okay and there’s still room for improvement”. I daresay that all my recipes are tried and tested on my blog, as my priced critics are my other half and my 2 sons. Then again, one man’s meat is another man’s poison…

The verdict: Thumbs Up, BUT, it’s still salty !!!

Okay…. Third time lucky, then 😜

I know there are many bloggers submitting their own rendition of the bak kwa in the CNY blog- hop cooking challenge, well, let’s say I’ve got the bug, too, and this snack is just one of my favourites during this auspicious occasion. Having said that, I’m submitting this post to “My Treasured Recipes #5 – Chinese New Year Goodies/ Valentine’s Day (Jan/Feb 2015)” hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House

I’m also sharing this post to Cook and Celebrate: Chinese New Year 2015 organised by Yen from Eat Your Heart Out, Diana from Domestic Goddess Wannabe and Zoe from Bake for Happy Kids.

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Chinese New Year is just round the corner and I’m sure every Chinese family is busy “spring cleaning” the house. I just received a message from one of my sisters that she’s dead tired cleaning every nook and cranny of the house in Kuching. No worries, sis. With the newly cleaned house, let us all hope for a new year filled with lots of good health, wealth and eternal happiness.

Gong Xi Fa Cai!

I also linking this post to Tasty Tuesdays with HonestMum Live




Cheers!

Christmas and the New Year celebrations have just passed us by. We have been pampered with a bit too much eating, from appetizers to starters to soups to main courses to desserts. Munching, chomping, slurping, burping… OMG!

I’m glad it’s over for now, albeit temporarily. My stomach needed a bit of rest after the eating marathon, so I decided to make something really clean and simple and yet very attractive and tasty. It’s everyone’s favourite – at least in my family – the delectable sushi, or rather, Makizushi or nori rolls.

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DIY Sushi Meal Kit

I have made sushi before when I was still in Kuching many moons ago. We made it from scratch, my sisters and I. Homemade sushi are definitely a notch higher than the store-bought ones or even the restaurants’ because we have control over what goes in the cylindrical gems. More often than not, the sushi rice served in restaurants are way too sweet, which I am not a fan of.

Both my sons are fans of Sushi of any type. I have made Inarizushi (sushi stuffed into fried tofu skin or aburaage). That became a hit with my guys.

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Once in a while during impromptu outings with my younger son, we would always end up in a Japanese resto ordering a sushi set lunch. My son, who is not a big eater could down these sushi in record time. But that also meant burning a hole in my pocket, hence the urge to home make the sushi rolls 😉

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Just before Christmas last year, I was at Stonemanor, a British store located at Everberg, Belgium.

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While filling my trolley with Christmas goodies, I was thrilled to see a Sushi Meal Kit on the Asian shelves, I grabbed 2 kits.

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Both kits included the following items –

• A Bamboo Rolling Mat (makisu)
• 4 Sushi Nori Sheets
• Sushi Rice (2 “Uncle Ben’s” type bags)
• Sushi Vinegar
• Japanese Soy Sauce
• Wasabi Paste
• Chopsticks (4 pairs in the red kit and 2 pairs in the yellow kit)
• Sushi Ginger or gari (not included in the yellow box)
• Sushi Recipe/ Instruction Leaflet

Per kit makes 4 large Makizushi, a main course for 2 or a starter for 4. Since there are 4 of us and I have planned to serve the sushi rolls as a main dish, hence I bought 2 kits. And by the way, I had actually planned to make those sushi rolls during the weekend of Valentine’s Day or Chinese New Year. Since CNY 2015 falls on 19th Feb, which is a Thursday, it will be difficult for me because it’s a workday. Honestly speaking , the 2 kits were too enticing for me to wait that long, I decided to ceremonially open both kits on the same day for our first weekend lunch anno 2015 🙂

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Instructions (per kit)

1. Put the 2 rice bags into a medium-sized saucepan and add enough water to cover the rice bags, soaking evenly.

2. Bring to the boil and simmer on a low heat for 11 – 12 minutes with the lid on.

3. Turn off the heat and drain the water using a sieve; put the rice in the sieve back into the saucepan and leave to stand for 25 – 30 minutes with the lid on. Do not open the lid!

4. Remove the rice from the bags and transfer the hot rice into a large bowl. Fold Sushi Vinegar into the rice. Wait until the hot rice cools down to a warm temperature before rolling the Sushi.

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Fillings

While the rice is cooking, prepare the fillings. At this point, just let your imagination run wild with you. I have actually used leftover vegetables from my fridge (yellow, orange and green paprikas, cucumber, carrot, spring onions and chives). Then again, the list is endless. You may want to go vegetarian or vegan or add slices of chicken or Peking duck meat. The sky’s the limit! I made a vegetarian version, with mock crab sticks and omelette with chives as protein.

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To Roll …

1. Place a sheet of nori onto the makisu (bamboo rolling mat). Spread the cooked rice as evenly as possible over the nori making sure to keep a thin layer of rice and leave a 1 cm gap free from rice at top and bottom as you will need this to seal the roll.

2. Before placing the strips of vegetables, surimi/ omelette on the rice, brush some wasabi paste or mayonnaise on the rice, from one end to the other, horizontally. Do not put too much filling in otherwise it will be difficult to roll.

3. Begin rolling the nori carefully and evenly around the filling, using the mat to help shape the Makizushi, rolling away from you and pressing firmly. Pull the bamboo mat away from you, and make sure to keep rolling the nori around itself.

4. Once the roll is complete, press down firmly on the mat helping to compress the roll slightly so that it keeps its shape.

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To Cut …

1. Remove the rolled sushi from the rolling mat and place onto a dry chopping board.

2. Using a very sharp knife, cut the roll in half. Then cut the 2 halves into 4 even lengths, making 8 Makizushi. Wash the knife occasionally between cutting each Sushi roll to prevent the rice from sticking to it and to ensure a cleaner cut.

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I served my Makizushi on a tray with some gari (sushi ginger) and wasabi paste. As far as the presentation is concerned, there’s still room for improvement, however, since that was the first time I have attempted making the Makizushi on my own, I thought that was not too bad at all 😉

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Without a doubt it was a mouth-watering lunch and what was even better was it was wholesome, healthy and à volonté.

No wasabi paste? No worries.

Not many people will go gaga on this green-colured paste. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish and its stem is used as a condiment and has an extremely strong flavor. Its hotness is not akin to that of a chilli but more so of hot mustard. The heat from the wasabi paste produces vapours that stimulates the nasal passages more than the tongue. And sometimes it even goes up to the head. Ha ha..

I found a good substitute for the wasabi paste. It’s also green in colour. It’s a cousin of the Tabasco sauce, the Tangy Green Jalapeño hot and zesty sauce from Heinz. I always have this bottle in my fridge. It goes very well with pizzas, salads, soups… It’s just so zingy and funky! Love it!

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The Day After

There were 2 sushi rolls left after the day before’s à volonté lunch. I used those as starter for our Sunday lunch. There were no gari and wasabi paste left, hence I made a simple and quick pickled cucumber with dhill. It went so well with the sushi rolls. It was super refreshing and scrummy. Yums!

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I’m sharing this post to the following blog-hop Cooking Challenges, my first linkup in 2015 😀

The Great Britsh Store Cupboard: Cooking with Herbs Challenge – January 2015

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“My Treasured Recipes #5 – Chinese New Year Goodies (Jan/Feb 2015)” hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House

Tasty Tuesdays by HonestMum

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January 2015 Family Foodies hosted by Eat Your Veg and Bangers & Mash

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January 2015 Vegetable Palette hosted by A2K – A Seasonal Veg Table

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Beth Fish Read’s Weekend Cooking

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Extra Veg with Helen at Fuss Free Flavours and Michelle at Utterly Scrummy

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Have a Healthy and Happy year!

Cheers

Baking – especially, bread – is not really my cup of tea, and yet I have baked this bread for the third time!

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When I baked this loaf for the first time, my sons urged me to bake it again the following day! Can you imagine that?

Well, I could totally understand 😉. Not only was the bread drop-dead gorgeous looking with the braids, it was immensely yummy with its wholesome filling.

And by the way, I have a secret to tell you, too.

I was amazed at how easy it was to put this bread together, especially coming from someone who does not have a penchant for bread-making. And believe you me, even the braiding was not rocket science. In fact it was simple weaving. I must say I was enjoying myself and feeling proud with every end result😉 

Secret of Success 

I owe my good execution (ahem!) to a great and humble “teacher”. I stumbled upon her recipes on YouTube. She has a very pleasing and honest voice and sweet disposition that easily magnetised a multitude of viewers and subscribers to her channels. There’s something about her that you can trust, ie, by following her recipes, you would end up being happy with the outcome. I have referred to two of her other recipes and have not felt disappointed.

She’s not a professional baker. Far from it. She’s like me – a mother with two sons, residing abroad, believes in God, loves her family and friends and cooking. To me, comparing like for like is the secret of success.

Well, shifu Aeri Lee, I nicked your recipe!

It was so good that I just had to spread the word. 

I followed Aeri’s dough method to a T while tweaking her ingredients by adding freshly torn basils and fresh thyme. I have also adjusted her main ingredients part of the recipe with flavours and degree of piquancy that agreed to our palates.

I added carrots for additional colour and texture. We all know carrots are available year-round, but there are unusual varieties harvested in late summer to autumn. Baby carrots, for instance.

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Main ingredients
(Inspired by Aeri’s Kitchen, tweaked according to personal taste) 

Yields 2 Loaves 

Baking time: 20 minutes at 200 deg Celsius 

  • 500 g mix of minced pork and kalf 
  • 2 Fresh tomatoes, chopped 
  • 1 Onion (diced) 
  • 1 tsp thai hot chilli flakes (not in recipe – optional)
  • 2 Garlic cloves (minced) 
  • 1 Red chilli (finely chopped) 
  • 1 Green chilli ( finely chopped)
  • Coarse Sea Salt (to taste) 
  • Freshly milled Sarawak white peppercorns (to taste) 
  • 1 Carrot (diced – not in recipe) 
  • 2 cm piece grated ginger (not in recipe) 
  • Olive Oil
    Fresh Basil (not in recipe) 
  • Some shredded or any grated cheese (not powder form) 

The Minced Filling – Method 

(Note: I made the filling the night before and refrigerated it) 

1. Sauteé the diced onion, minced garlic and grated ginger until fragrant. 

2. Add the minced meat. Stir and mix to combine until the meat turned colour (from pink to slightly cooked). 

3. Then add the chopped tomatoes, diced carrots, chilli flakes, finely chopped fresh chillies. Stir-fry for a few minutes and then add some freshly milled Sarawak white peppercorns, salt to taste and freshly-torn basil leaves. 

Dough Ingredients – 

  • 3 1/4 Cups All Purpose Flour 
  • 1/2 Cup Water (luke warm) 
  • 1/2 Cup Milk (luke warm) 
  • 1 Tbsp Butter (room temperature
  • 1 Tbsp Sugar 
  • 2 1/4 tsp Active Yeast (1 package)
  • 1 tsp Salt
    1 Egg Yoke (for egg wash) 
  • Fresh Thyme (not in recipe)
  • Fresh Basil (not in recipe) 


The Dough – Method 

1. In a large bowl, pour in the milk, water and yeast. Set aside for 5 minutes 

2. Then add in the Self-raising flour, salt, sugar, butter, basil and thyme. Knead the dough. 

3. Lightly grease the bowl and place the kneaded dough in a warm place for at least one hour (or in the oven with just the light on)

For the step-by-step method of handling and weaving the dough please refer here

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With the temperature outside plummeting to single digit of late, a slice of the freshly baked chilli bread is just mesmeric. Mmmm….

And what’s great about this bread is you can concoct the filling to a vegetarian version with ratatouille. The next time I bake this bread, I will make a curry chicken filling. Can’t wait😍

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I am linking this post to the following blog-hop cooking challenges – 

My Treasured Recipes #3 – Taste of Autumn (Oct/Nov 2014) hosted by Miss B of Everybody Eats Well in Flanders and co-hosted by Charmaine of Mimi Bakery House 

Lavender and Lovage’s “Sugar & Spice (November and December Cooking with Herbs Challenge)”

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Bangers & Mash’s November’s Spice Trail – Peppercorns

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This post is linked to Tasty Tuesdays hosted by Le Coin de Mel!

  

Have a fantastic weekend! 

Cheers!